More Thailand cuisine and maybe some “ผลไม้” too!

Pad Krapow Moo Saap (Fried Basil and Pork)

Thailand cuisine
Thailand cuisine

 

An incredibly popular ‘one plate’ dish for lunch or dinner, fried basil and pork is certainly one of the most popular Thailand cuisine. It is made in a piping hot wok with lots of holy basil leaves, large fresh chilli, pork, green beans, soy sauce and a little sugar.

The minced, fatty pork is oily and mixes with the steamed white rice for a lovely fulfilling meal. It is often topped with a fried egg (kai dao) you will most likely be asked if you would like an egg with it.

Be aware that most Thai people ask for lots of chilli in this dish so if you are not a fan of tingling lips, ask for you pad krapow ‘a little spicy’.

 

Gaeng Daeng (Red Curry)

Thailand cuisine
Thailand cuisine

 

Made with morsels of meat, red curry paste, smooth coconut milk and topped off with a sprinkling of finely sliced kaffir lime leaves, this rich, aromatic curry always gets those taste buds tingling.

At its best when the meat is stunningly tender, it could be likened to a beautiful woman: it’s mild, sweet and delicately fragrant. And like all true love affairs, absence makes the heart grow fonder.

 

Mango (Ma-Muang)

Thailand cuisine
Thailand cuisine

 

One of the most well-known fruits in Thailand, there are many varieties of the delicious, refreshing mango and a few different ways of eating it. When ripe, it can be halved and eaten with a spoon, while many choose to enjoy it with sticky rice and coconut milk (Khao Niew Ma-muang).

Others like to eat it half-ripe and dip the crunchy slices in sugar. Also makes a wonderful juice.

Pad Thai (Thai style Fried Noodles)

Thailand cuisine
Thailand cuisine

 

From Cape Town to Khao San Road, the default international Thailand cuisine! Dropped in a searing hot wok, fistfuls of small, thin or wide noodles (you choose) do a steamy minute-long dance alongside crunchy beansprouts, onion and egg, before disembarking for the nearest plate.

A truly interactive eating experience, half its fun (and flavour) lies in then using a quartet of accompanying condiments – fish sauce, sugar, chilli powder and finely ground peanuts – to wake it from its slumbers.