The last 3 places in top 9 places to visit in Myanmar for tourists who want to experience the tranquility.

 

3. Shwedagon Pagoda

Top 9 places to visit in Myanmar
Top 9 places to visit in Myanmar

The Shwedagon or Greater Dragon Pagoda is considered the most sacred site in Buddhism in Myanmar because it contains a strand of Buddha’s hair and other religious relics. The 2,500-year-old pagoda is located on Singuttara Hill in Yangon, the largest city in Myanmar. Over the centuries, the pagoda has grown from 8 meters to 99 meters (26 feet to 366 feet).

The origins of Shwedagon are lost in antiquity but it is estimated that the Pagoda was first built by the Mon during the Bagan period, sometime between the 6th and 10th century AD. It is covered in gold leaf; the stupa is covered in 4,531 diamonds. Numerous temples, statues and stupas can be found at this unforgettable site. Pagoda visitors are expected to follow a dress code (trousers preferred, T-shirts with elbow-length sleeves) and enter the temple barefooted.

 

2.Golden Rock

Top 9 places to visit in Myanmar
Top 9 places to visit in Myanmar

Golden Rock, or Kyaiktiyo Zedi as it is known locally, is a totally awesome sight: a pagoda (zedi) sitting atop a huge boulder that appears as if it’s about to fall off the edge of a cliff. Both are covered in golf leaf. The locals believe the boulder, which sits 1,100 meters (3,600 feet) above sea level, is held in place through a miracle of Buddha; the pagoda is said to contain a strand of his hair.

Visiting here is a pilgrimage for Myanmar Buddhists. Golden Rock is about a five-hour drive from Yangon, and also involves a long walk. A staircase leads to the pagoda complex that houses several viewing platforms and Buddha shrines.

 

1.Bagan

Top 9 places to visit in Myanmar
Top 9 places to visit in Myanmar

Travelers with a passion for Buddhist temples, pagodas and stupas should have a field day in Bagan, since it contains more of these than any other place in the world. The most popular destination in Myanmar, Bagan was the capital of the First Burmese Empire from the 9th to the 13th centuries.

The site that Marco Polo once described as the “gilded city” was home to around Buddhist 13,000 temples in its 11th-century heyday. Thousands of temples, stupas and pagodas remain, including the famous Ananda temple with its sparkling gold spires.